Tag Archives: git

If you mixed Git and Dropbox, and made it open source…

…you’d get SparkleShare. It automatically synchronizes directories to Git repositories, whether you host them locally or on some service like GitHub.

Now, don’t get me wrong: this isn’t how you want to do version control for your software, where meaningful commits are important.  This is more for “data” or “asset” files – I’ve seen it used for project artwork/icons, for instance. It can also be handy for managing an essentially static web site built with a tool like Jekyll. For those use cases, it can be a great tool, particularly for non-programmers.

I’ve recorded a screencast showing how to install (even as a non-admin) the app on Windows, set it up to link with your GitHub account (they handle ssh keys transparently in the background), and add your first repo. Enjoy!

[EDIT: Sorry, Screenr has gone away along with this screencast.]

 

[EDIT TO ADD]: Ubuntu includes SparkleShare in its repos, but it’s an outdated version (in all releases). A useful PPA to add would be this: https://launchpad.net/~rebuntu16/+archive/sparkleshare+unofficial Note that SparkleShare requires Git, and the newer the version of Git, the better your life generally is, so make sure you have the Git update PPA also enabled: https://launchpad.net/~git-core/+archive/ppa . Something like this would add them for you:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:rebuntu16/sparkleshare+unofficial
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:git-core/ppa
sudo apt-get update
(optionally sudo apt-get dist-upgrade or other method of upgrading your git packages)
sudo apt-get install sparkleshare

VR Juggler tools and binaries on GitHub

Now that the semester’s over, I’ve been able to catch up on a bit of a backlog and put up a few VR Juggler-related items on GitHub. For all these items, click the link to visit the GitHub repo, which will also show you a nicely-rendered README with more information.

  • Jconf Grapher – This is a Python script for parsing jconf files (including their inclusions) and outputting Doxygen code to draw a graph of devices, proxies, and proxy aliases. I’ve included a silly shell script wrapping this to directly output PDF files, and have also made a minimal GUI for exploring these graphs, using XDot and PyGTK. Cross-platform: runs anywhere Python, PyGTK, and Doxygen do. (Tested on Linux and Windows.) Free and open source (Boost Software License 1.0, a very permissive license), feel free to fork and improve!
  • Jconf Display Merger – As I’ve discovered that VR Juggler on Windows works better with fewer windows in favor of more viewports per window, I put together this Python script to automate the process of merging display windows in jconf files (appropriately re-adjusting origins and sizes, etc).  There’s a command-line version that works everywhere and merges all windows into a single one, and for more control, you can use the GUI that lets you select which windows to merge. GUI is built on PySide (the LGPL replacement for PyQt). Cross-platform (command-line requiring Python 2.4, GUI requiring Python 2.5, Qt 4.6+, and PySide), though I have only tested on Linux. Free and open source (Boost Software License 1.0, a very permissive license), feel free to fork and improve!
  • METaL JConf files – Our group at Iowa State University recently got a new virtual reality system, a three-wall CAVE called METaL. We’re using VR Juggler to build applications for it, and in the interest of both easily maintaining configuration files and providing an up-to-date example, I’m hosting the VR Juggler 3.0 jconf files for the system on GitHub. They’re still a bit of a work in progress, but definitely usable – if you have a similar system it might be easiest to fork them on GitHub for easy integration of improvements.
  • VR Juggler 3.0 Windows binaries – Building VR Juggler can be a bit tricky, and building software on Windows can be a bit of a hassle, so you can imagine that combining them isn’t necessarily something you want to be doing every day. The most recent “official” Windows binaries are for the ancient 2.2.1.  I’ve started building from SVN, on the 3.0 branch, and pushing the installed tree to GitHub, so I don’t have to build VR Juggler separately on every machine I use: I can just clone the repo, and pull when I update the build.  Right now I only have the 32-bit builds for VC9, but I anticipate eventually adding other variants. (They’ll be in different branches named accordingly.)

As always with any of my grad school-related work, if you use or build on anything I make available, I’d really appreciate hearing from you. Information on how our work is used is helpful when providing reports and seeking renewal of the funding that makes this possible.

Git version control, Xcode, and Linux

Git and I

Within the last year, I’ve started to use Git (a distributed version control system) to manage changes to my personal and academic projects.  If you’ve used SVN or CVS before, the basic concept of storing multiple versions and committing changes is similar, but it’s otherwise a bit different: with Git, branching and merging is cheap (time-wise) and very easy, so you’re encouraged to branch and merge often.  This fosters a healthy “keep the master (trunk) branch stable” habit while you continue development of features, each in their own branch.  Additionally, Git has a concept of “staging” your changes – it doesn’t commit all of your modifications by default, so you can make sure that each commit is “atomic” – that it accomplishes only one thing.  Even when doing weekly class assignments now, I use Git as a way to track my progress, incentivize rapid progress (committing changes gives a rush of energy), and store working versions without making many messy copies of my source directory.  Read on for what I’ve learned and how to get started! Continue reading